Installing A Hard Start Relay

Hard Start RelayHard Start RelayHard Start RelayHard Start RelayHard Start RelayHard Start RelayHard Start RelayHard Start RelayThere are numerous reasons why you may want to install a hard start relay on your vintage VW. A hard start relay basically directs the electrical current from the battery, through the relay and to the starter motor instead of routing it through the ignition switch. This eliminates a path of approximately 15′ of wiring and potentially bad connections. Once installed, your ignition key simply activates the relay. You can pick up a 4 post, 12v relay at most automotive stores, Ebay or Amazon for around 5 dollars. I already had some 12 gauge wiring and terminals, so I only have about 5 dollars and 30 minutes invested in to this project. You can buy ready made kits, but they can be pretty expensive, up to 35 dollars. Mabel wasn’t exhibiting any syntoms that would justify the install of the hard start relay, but not knowing what the future may hold, I thought I’d go ahead and install one. You don’t have to be a electrical genius to install the relay, but it does help to have the right tools. It doesn’t require any cutting or splicing of the original wiring. Wiring will vary from year to year, so depending on the age of your VW, your install may differ just a bit, but for the most part, it’ll be the same. If you look at the first pic, you’ll see that I’ve labeled what connector goes where on the relay. Start by disconnecting the battery. Locate the wire that goes from the ignition switch to the starter solenoid. Unless your VW has had previous wiring changes, more than likely, it’ll be a larger red wire with a quick disconnect. This wire will go to pin 87 on the relay. Make up a jumper that will go from pin 85 to the ignition switch (quick disconnect). Next, you need to make up a ground wire that will go from pin 86 on the relay to ground. I grounded mine where I mounted it to the floor pan support. Now you’ll need to make up a cable that’ll go from the positive post on the battery to pin 30 on the relay. You can also run this from the B+ post on the voltage regulator if you don’t want to run it to the battery. Lastly, you’ll need to mount the relay. You can mount it just about anywhere that will ensure a good ground. I chose the floor pan support. Don’t forget to connect your ground wire to the relay.

Latest VW Beetle Desktop Wallpaper

VW Beetle Desktop WallpaperVW Beetle Desktop WallpaperVW Beetle Desktop WallpaperVW Beetle Desktop WallpaperVW Beetle Desktop WallpaperVW Beetle Desktop WallpaperLast week I took Mabel down to my favorite place to take pics of our cars. These were my favorites and the ones that I’ll be rotating as my desktop wallpaper until I decide to take updated pictures next spring. Feel free to use them for yourself. Just click on the pic you want, right click within the pic and save to your own pc.

1:64 Scale Surfboard For Diorama Beetle

Building 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardHad some time this evening and decided to make a surfboard to go with the roof rack that I completed yesterday for the 1:64 scale diorama. Wanted it to look vintage, so I decided to make it out of wood with a nice seal. I started with a popsicle stick, cut it to length, trimmed the sides, then started sanding to get the right dimensions. For a fin, I cut a piece of card stock, attached it with super glue, then coated the whole board in super glue to give it a nice finish and shine. Pretty quick and easy project, took maybe an hour or so.

Diorama Update / 1:64 Scale VW Beetle Roof Rack Version 2

1:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 2Even though I was happy with my first attempt at a 1:64 scale roof rack for the diorama Beetle, I knew that I could do a better job with it. I re-thought the design and started from scratch again. Small paper clips were still used for the frame. Instead of trying glue anything, I soldered it together with a much smaller tip on my soldering iron. For the wooden slats, I used strips of card stock soaked in super glue. I was a little more patient with this attempt and I think it turned out much better. I may give it a 3rd try in the future, but I’m much happier with this one than I was with the first one.

Diorama Update / 1:64 Scale VW Beetle Roof Rack

Diorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackCompleted Roof RackCompleted Roof RackSince I had fairly good success making the swamp cooler for the Beetle diorama, I wanted to continue to add by making a roof rack for the Beetle. I kicked around ideas for materials and finally decided to use small paper clips for the frame. I didn’t want it to look new, so removing the kinks from the paper clip gave it just enough wear. I used needle nose pliers to bend and shape the frame, trying my best to keep in to scale. I also tried different methods to hold the frame together. JB Weld didn’t work very well and it was very clumpy. Epoxy didn’t well either and like the JB Weld, it was clumpy. I had a little success with super glue gel, but in the end, it just didn’t work out. I ended up soldering the parts together. It’s still a little clumpy, not too bad. For the wooden slats, I was going to use a popsicle stick, but the scale wasn’t so great. What I ended up doing was folding a piece of paper 4 ways and gluing it together. This gave me a good thickness that was close to scale. After the glue was dry, I cut it into strips, dunked them into stain and let them dry. I did use the super glue to secure the slats to the frame. All in all, I’m pleased. It’s not perfect, but building one from scratch at this scale is very difficult.

Diorama Update / 1:64 Scale Swamp Cooler

1:64 Scale Swamp Cooler1:64 Scale Swamp Cooler1:64 Scale Swamp Cooler1:64 Scale Swamp CoolerVW Garage DioramaVW Garage DioramaVW Garage DioramaVW Garage DioramaVW Garage DioramaVW Garage DioramaVW Garage DioramaVW Garage DioramaWorking on the diorama is always a good way to pass time on rainy days. I haven’t had any updates to it since the end of winter, but had an opportunity to add a couple of things this past weekend. I’ve been wanting to add a swamp cooler to one of the shop beetles, but finding material to build one at 1:64 scale proved to be a challenge. I ended up finding a few pieces of plastic tubing in my “junk drawer” that seemed to work perfectly. I can’t remember where they came from or what they were initially intended for. I didn’t take photos of the entire process, but basically these 2 pieces of tubing, a little super glue and JB Weld got the job done. I’m pleased with the way it turned out. Next project for this shop beetle is a new roof rack.

Repair The Repaired Surfboard

Repairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardRepairing The Repaired SurfboardLenora acquired a Rusty surfboard for Mabel a couple of months ago from friends who had picked it up at a VW show in another state. I’d been looking for one for a while and if you’re lucky enough to even find one for sale around north eastern Kentucky, they’re very, very expensive. I’ve been told that this is an early 70’s board that had been damaged some time in it’s life and repaired. It’s supposed to be a quality board, honestly, I don’t know. It’ll probably never see water again unless Mabel is getting a bath, for the rest of it’s life, it’s just a prop. I decided to “redo” the repair only because whoever had done the original repair didn’t take a lot of time to camouflage it. It actually looked pretty bad. This time around, I’m not going to try to hide the repair, just make it look better. Just like Mabel, I want people to see all of the bumps and bruises, that’s what gives it character. I’d thought about having it repainted originally, but I’m sure it’s probably not worth spending anymore money on it. Again, it’s just a prop. I did print some new Rusty logos to put over the repair just so people could see what kind of board it is. I may clear coat it in a couple of days or may just leave it the way it is….I like the way it turned out.