3rd Brake Light Follow Up

New 3rd Brake LightNew 3rd Brake LightNew 3rd Brake LightNew Euro TagNew Euro TagFinished installing the 3rd brake light today. Turned out exactly the way that I wanted it to. Its new, but still has a hint of a vintage look. And boy is it bright, itll certainly get peoples attention at night. I also installed my European tag that I ordered from customeuropeanplates.com. 68 for the year, KY for the state, then E272 which is my historical plate number. It also came with a free mounting bracket. Very pleased with the quality.

3rd Brake Light Project

3rd Tail Light Project3rd Tail Light Project3rd Tail Light Project3rd Tail Light Project3rd Tail Light ProjectSo Ive started on another project that may appeal to some and may be repulsive to others, but hey, its my Beetle and Ill do what I want. lol Anyhow, I wanted to add a 3rd brake light but keep the vintage look without paying the price for a vintage brake light. So I turned to Speedway Motors to see if they had a red lens lamp that would match the amber fog lights that I installed a couple of months ago. Unfortunately, they only offered amber and clear. As a matter of fact, finding a red lens fog light is pretty much impossible and since I wanted the style to match my amber fog lights, I ordered the clear lamp from Speedway Motors, ordered a bumper bracket to mount it on and set out to find a way to make it red. While waiting for the goodies to arrive, I went ahead and did the wiring for the new lamp. That took all of 5 minutes. I thought about replacing the bulb with a red bulb, but finding a red bulb that would work was also impossible. Then I thought about making a gel that I could put behind the lens. Again, these lamps from Speedway Motors are really nice, built to last and of course, theyre sealed. So that blew out the gel idea. While researching, I came across this product by VHT specifically for clear lenses. Its used to make them red or it can be used to freshen up your already red lenses. It stated that itd work on glass, so I figured Id give it a try. If it didnt work, itd be easy enough to remove and Id be back to square one. My bracket wont be here until Friday, but the lamp arrived today. So I took it apart, prepped the lens and gave the VHT product a try. Id already tested it on a piece of plexi-glass that I had laying around and it worked wonderfully, but I still wasnt sure how itd work on a glass lens. I gave the lens a total of 3 coats, waiting 15 minutes in between each coat. This stuff dries very fast, applies very smoothly and is very easy to work with. After 3 coats and about 8 hours of drying time, I put the lamp back together and tested it with the wiring that Id already installed. I think it looks great, now I just have to wait for the bracket mount to arrive.

Rear Shelf Project Part 3

Rear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildMade a trip to Hobby Lobby to pick up material to wrap up the rear shelf project. I had planned to use the same vinyl that I used on the trunk liner project, but found something else that I thought would work and look a lot better. Best way to describe it is like a very think, heavy duty felt. With material and staple gun in hand, I began to stretch, fit and staple the material to the rear shelf. Very happy with the end result, it fits perfectly, at just the angle that I wanted it to. All in all, a very easy project with minimal costs. The plywood that I used was scrap that I had laying around, I have right at 7 dollars in material and a total of about 2 hours time in the project. If youre wanting a rear speaker shelf and dont want to fork out 60 dollars for some crappy aftermarket piece, this project is easy enough for just about anybody with a power saw, jig saw and a couple hours to spare.

Rear Shelf Project Part 1
Rear Shelf Project Part 2
Rear Shelf Project Part 3

Rear Shelf Project Part 2

Rear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildFinished sanding all of the edges, getting everything symmetrical. Applied 2 layers of felt to give it a little padding. I think Im going to use the same vinyl that I used for the trunk liner. Will hopefully have everything wrapped up this weekend.

Rear Shelf Project Part 1
Rear Shelf Project Part 2
Rear Shelf Project Part 3

Rear Shelf Project Part 1

Rear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildRear Shelf BuildSo I decided to start on the rear shelf project today. Id priced some online, but just cant justify paying 60 dollars for a flimsy piece of material when I can build something a bit more beefy for a lot less. I wanted something strong that I may end up mounting speakers beneath, but still light enough that it can be easily removed. So I decided to make my own rear shelf out of 1/2 plywood that will be covered either in carpet to match the interior or some type of industrial material that will blend well. Remember to measure twice and cut once. Got this one on the first try, test fitted perfectly and it gives the look that Im going for with the stability of heavier material. I glued and screwed a support that will keep the shelf from bowing or sagging over time. All thats left to do is find the right material to cover it. That search begins tomorrow. And the best part, other than my time, it hasnt cost anythingyet!

Rear Shelf Project Part 1
Rear Shelf Project Part 2
Rear Shelf Project Part 3

Vintage Radio Install Part 2

Vintage Radio InstallationVintage Radio InstallationVintage Radio InstallationFinished installing the vintage radio into the Beetle this evening. Had to remove the air intake to install the back support for the radio. Installed the speaker and buttoned everything up. Very pleased with the end result, wouldnt hesitate to do it again.

Vintage Radio Installation

Vintage Radio Install Part 1

1968 VW Beetle Vintage Radio Install1968 VW Beetle Vintage Radio Install1968 VW Beetle Vintage Radio Install1968 VW Beetle Vintage Radio InstallIve been wanting to install a vintage radio in the Beetle for some time now and last week I came across a great deal on a new old stock Tenna Ranger that is period correct. So I received the radio in the mail the other day and was excited to open the box that had been sealed for over 47 years. This is the same radio kit that the dealers wouldve installed at the dealership after you purchased your new Beetle. My next hope was that the radio would actually work after being tucked away that long. Regardless of whether it worked or not, it was going to get installed. So last night, I began the install process. The hardest part so far was removing the dash pad material that would open the hole for the radio. This stuff is extremely tough. But after an hour or so of chipping away at it, the opening was clear and ready for the install. The radio slid right in and locked into place. Next, it was a matter of feeding the wires through the back and connecting the antenna. At this point, it was time to test the radio. Hot wire was connected to the fuse bus, ground wire was secured, wire for the radio light was piggybacked off of the speedo light and the speaker was temporarily connected. To my amazement, the radio fired up, all of the controls and the light worked and even the speaker worked. I was very, very pleased. I quickly tuned in an AM station and listened to the sounds of the 60s and 70s. Next, Ill install the rear support for the radio (air intake will have to come out temporarily to gain access), install the speaker and button up the wiring. Hope to get it finished up tomorrow night.

1968 VW Beetle Vintage Radio Install