Custom Hot Wheels Junkyard Charger Part V

Hot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerAlright, so I got more done today than I had actually planned. While I’d rather be outside doing something, the weather has different plans. Anyhow, I’m about 95% finished with the chassis. Got a nice weathering layer on it, painted in some details, but there’s just a bit more to do. I’ll let this dry for a couple of days, then finish. Again, for texturing the base of the car, I used steel wool that has been soaked in vinegar and hydrogen peroxide, then left to dry over the summer. Everything gets a nice coat of flat clear before proceeding to the next layer. As I mentioned before, I haven’t decided on the final configuration, but hopefully in the next day or so, everything will come together. It’s starting to take shape!

Custom Hot Wheels Junkyard Charger Part IV

Hot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerHot Wheels Custom ChargerSince it’s a nasty, wet, winter day, I decided to start on the 2nd layer of weathering. I’ll usually let these projects set for a couple of days in between adding things just to let my mind clear and come up with new ideas. But since it’s nasty outside, I decided to press on. The second layer of weathering for the body consisted of bring out some of the detail using pastel chalks to fill in the seams and grooves. Since this car has been sitting outside for a very long time. I added some greens for moss, blacks for mold and brown for more surface rust. It’s really beginning to look like it’s been outside for a very long time. After painting the interior a leather brown earlier in the week, it’s now time to give it some weathering as well. I gave it a light coat of spray adhesive, let it sit for about 15 minutes, then brushed on crushed steel wool that had soaked in vinegar and hydrogen peroxide and dried over the summer. It gives it a nice texture. Once it’s nice and dry, I’ll add more weathering to it. I also started on the wheels and tires. I’m still haven’t decided the final configuration, but at least 3 of the tires will be flat and one will be off the car. I have to give it some more thought. The base was given it’s first coat of flat black, detail on it will come soon!

Custom Hot Wheels Junkyard Charger Part III

Custom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerApplied first layer of weathering on the custom Junkyard Charger. Keeping the base coat of red primer (which I’ll build off of later), I soaked the body in water, the carefully covered areas with salt that I’ll want to remain rusty. Once the water evaporated, I sprayed the body with the color of paint that had been original to the car. For this custom, I chose white. After a couple of light coats were dried, I simply brushed the salt off of the car under running warm water. This will give me a good base to work from. More soon!

Custom Hot Wheels Junkyard Charger

Custom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerA little progression on the custom Junkyard Charger. Gave the body some temporary color just to make it easier to work with after adding some dents and dings on the body. The dents were created by using a steel cutting bit on the dremel, being careful not toe dig too deep. These areas will show up much better once color and texture are applied. I also changed the color of the interior from black to leather brown after I cut the side of the drivers area out using an X acto knife. It looks much better with the door open. The interior will be washed and textured to make it look aged and dirty. That’s a lot easier to do with brown interior. I’ll also need to move the vent/wing glass to the door that’s open. The whole base has also been de-chromed. Some chrome accents will be added back later. People have asked what I use to de-chrome. Many household products will work, but I use Comet Soft Cleanser with Bleach. It’s pasty and sticks to the parts. I let the part lay in the Comet for about 10 minutes and the chrome is gone. Plus you can recycle and use it over and over. A little progress on the windshield and other glass in the car. This is an area that I need to get better with, but it’s not looking to bad so far. I’ve also added the perfect wheels and tires. I’ll save the original Hot Wheels wheels for something else. The wheels and tires that I’m using came off of a M2 sixty something Mustang. Once they’re aged and textured, they’ll look great! That’s about it for now. Hope to work on it a bit more this weekend.

Starting On A New Custom

Custom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerFigured it was time to start on another custom. I’ve been wanting to do a “abandoned car” scene for a long time, so I think this old Charger will be a good candidate. A lot of people think that “junked cars” are the easiest to do because you don’t have to concentrate on detail like you do if you’re restoring a car. However, that’s not true, as a matter a fact, to get the right look and feel, there is much more detail to address. I started this car by separating it from the base. I want this car to look like it’s been picked through and robbed of parts. First detail on this one will be to open the door. I do this by cutting a relief along the door line with a dremel and cutting wheel. Basically, you just follow the casting lines in the door. I cut a small relief in the front (hinge) of the door, but not all of the way through. This will allow you to bend the door open a bit while still keeping it attached to the car. When I was cutting the reliefs in the door with the dremel, I accidentally went a little to high and hit the roof line. Custom Hot Wheels ChargerCustom Hot Wheels ChargerThis is an easy fix. After I stripped the car of paint, I just filled the cut with super glue, then sprinkled it with baking soda. I’ve used the process in the past to fill voids and it works like a charm. It dries instantly and can be sanded immediately. These pics were taken about 5 minutes a part. Stay tuned for more updates in the near future, I plan to work on this custom through the holidays just to fill in time. I’ll also be testing some new weathering techniques.

Christmas Vacation Custom Wagon Final Touch

Christmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsEven though I finished this custom last week, there was still one thing that I wanted to add, the Christmas Trees For Sale sign. I finally found one that I thought would go good with the theme and printed them on the color laser printer on plain paper. I glued the print to thin card stock then cut them out individually. Each sign is less than a half an inch wide. For the post, I distressed a cleaning swab, stained it, then glued the sign to each side. After everything dried, it was just a matter of adding it to the custom. I think it added a nice little touch.

Christmas Vacation Custom Wagon Update 2

Christmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsChristmas Vacation Custom Hot WheelsOne step closer to completing this custom. Finished the wood grain side panels that actually turned out a lot better than I thought they would. These didn’t have to be perfect because they would be partially hidden behind faux snow, but the dry brush technique worked perfectly. I’ve watched at least one video of a very talented custom builder trying to do this same custom and they struggled with the snow and ice on the car. This made me think long and hard about what I was going to use to replicate snow and ice stuck to the car. After looking at numerous glues and paints that I had available, I decided to go a whole different direction. Lenora had recently re-glazed some of the windows in the house and was using a latex based glaze. I remember thinking how much the texture of the glaze reminded me of frozen snow. We had some left over, so I thought I’d give it a try. It was a bit dry to use right out of the tube, but I thinned it a little with water and it brushed on the car exactly how I wanted it to. I kept building up layers until I was satisfied with the look. Once it’s dry, I may add a little more once I address the wheels. Won’t be long and it’ll be time to mount the tree.