New Exhaust Installation Part III

Cleaning Up Tins For New ExhaustCleaning Up Tins For New ExhaustCleaning Up Tins For New ExhaustCleaning Up Tins For New ExhaustCleaning Up Tins For New ExhaustContinued to prep for the new exhaust installation. Not a whole lot more we can do until the new exhaust arrives. Today, I decided to clean up the rear engine tins to make them look a bit better. I started by stripping the paint off the tins by using Dupli-Color paint stripper. I let them soak in the heat for about ten minutes, then sprayed them off with the water hose. I repeated this process 3 times to get as much paint off as I could. I then dried them and used a wire wheel to remove any paint that was left and then sanded them with 400 grit sandpaper. For a final prep, I used Dupli-Color Paint Prep to remove any grease, oil or other contaminates that might keep the paint from sticking. I then painted the tins with Dupli-Color Matte Black engine paint. I gave all of the tins 3 coats, waiting about 15 minutes in between coats. A little elbow grease, 15 dollars in supplies and the tins look 100% better. I also picked up some anti-seize to use when I install the new exhaust. That’s about all I can do until the new exhaust arrives. Hopefully it’ll be here later this week.

New Exhaust Installation Part I
New Exhaust Installation Part II
New Exhaust Installation Part IV
New Exhaust Installation Part V

New Exhaust Installation Part II

VW Beetle Exhaust InstallationVW Beetle Exhaust InstallationVW Beetle Exhaust InstallationVW Beetle Exhaust InstallationVW Beetle Exhaust Installation Not a big update for part 2 of the new exhaust installation. I’m still awaiting word from CIP1.com that the new exhaust has shipped. I decided to go ahead and remove the existing exhaust. Since I had already broken loose the nuts that secure the muffler to the head, all that I had left to do was remove the 4 bolts that secure the heat riser to the muffler and the 2 clamps that secure the muffler to the J pipes or heat exchangers. I don’t (and wouldn’t) plan to re-use the clamps that secure the muffler to the J pipes or heat changers. Most installation kits will come with new clamps and O ring seals. I’m also going to take this opportunity to clean up the head studs before installing the new exhaust. I’ll also use anti-seize when installing the new brass nuts. I’m also going to clean up the engine tin a bit and I’ll probably strip and paint the tins that had to be removed in order to take out the muffler. As far as the Abarth exhaust, I was planning on selling it. Some parts of it still have factory paint on them. It does look like there’s an exhaust leak around one set of pipes. It appears that the weld has broken loose. If somebody wanted it and had a welder, I’m sure they could fix it in just a couple of minutes.

New Exhaust Installation Part I
New Exhaust Installation Part III
New Exhaust Installation Part IV
New Exhaust Installation Part V

New Exhaust Installation Part I

Preparing To Replace MufflerPreparing To Replace MufflerPreparing To Replace MufflerPreparing To Replace MufflerPreparing To Replace MufflerI still have a few days before the new OEM exhaust arrives, but since I was catching up on a couple other projects in the garage, I decided to get a head start on removing the existing exhaust. I wanted to video this process, but the battery in my GoPro is dead and I didn’t want to wait for it to charge. So for now, pictures will have to do. The first concern any time you do this is the condition of the head studs and nuts that secure the muffler. I had already taken a peek at mine when I replaced the intake year before last and was happy to discover the the previous owner had used brass nuts to secure the muffler to the heads. Brass won’t rust and less likely to seize to the studs. Usually, the first step would be to raise the rear of the Beetle for easy access, but since I’m only removing the tin to take a better look, I skipped raising the rear for now. I removed all of the piping for heat first, this differs a bit from year to year, but it’s pretty much self explanatory. Remove them gently so you can re-use them. I’m running J pipes, but I still keep everything plumbed just in case I want to put heat exchangers back on. The outlet on the dog house shroud is capped to keep the air flowing over the engine. If I ever do put heat exchangers back on, I’ll just remove the caps. Next step is to remove the rear tin. For me, this was a total of twelve 6x12mm 6mm shroud screws and washers. Shroud Screws If you’re missing these screws or want to replace them to dress up your engine bay, most VW vendors sell them for about 5 dollars for a set of 12. This is a good time to put your Titan Magnetic Parts Tray to use. Helps to keep your nuts and bolts from being lost or kicked across the garage. Once all of the screws are removed, all you need to do is to remove the rear tin. If your engine bay seal is in really good condition, it will take some maneuvering to get the tin out, but it’s a fairly easy process. Once the tin is removed, you’ll have easy access to the nuts that secure the muffler to the head (the bottom nuts are easier to remove from beneath the car) and the heat riser screws. [Read more…]

Next Project, New Exhaust

1967 Reverse LightsNew Exhaust ProjectThe Beetle has had a Abarth exhaust on it ever since I bought it. They’re a great exhaust and they look good, but I’ve never been a fan of the sound. I’m also pretty sure that the tubes to the heat risers are clogged with carbon. One of things that make Beetles unique is the bubbly exhaust. So, I’ve decided the next project will be to remove the Abarth exhaust and replace it with a stock exhaust. I put in the order to CIP1.com today. After a quick inspection of the current exhaust, I noticed that the person who installed it did it right. Looks like the heads have new studs and they also used brass nuts to secure the exhaust to the heads. This area can be a real problem if steel nuts had been used, you can easily snap the studs a part if the nut is rusted to the stud. I’ll still give each nut a good soaking with PB Blaster and take my time when it comes to removing the nuts from the studs. This is one step that you don’t want to get into a rush. So hopefully, the new exhaust will be delivered in the next week or so and I’ll put together a “how to” on replacing the exhaust.

Avon Beetles

Avon Beetles

Shauna and Lenora have managed to get me 2 of the 3 Avon Beetles that were released in the 1970’s. Oddly enough, both of these are full of cologne and sort of smell like Old Spice…..I’m only missing the blue one, but I’m sure in time, we’ll find it. Shauna was also able to get me the VW Rabbit that is also full of the same cologne. They’re a nice addition to the collection.

New Die Cast and a New Redline

More VW Die Cast1968 Redline Hot Heap1968 Redline Hot Heap1968 Redline Hot HeapLenora knows all of my vices! She got me some really nice additions for the collection. For the VW collection, she got me a VW Bus from the TV series LOST which we finally started watching a week or so ago. She also got a VW Beetle from the movie Forrest Gump. These are the Greenlight Hollywood brand. We’ve got a few others from this manufacturer and they’re nice, quality pieces. She also got me an original “Sweet Sixteen” Antifreeze Hot Heap redline. When you look at this car, it’s hard to believe that it’s 50 years old and has survived to be in this kind of condition. It’s a near mint piece that looks like it’s never been played with. Very, very nice! The redlines are finally adding up. Happy Valentines Day!!!!

Diorama More Bits and Pieces

More Bits And PiecesMore Bits And PiecesMore Bits And PiecesMore Bits And PiecesMore Bits And PiecesJust a few more bits and pieces and this project will be done. Lenora has inspired me to do a 1:43 or 1:18 scale diorama in the future. The biggest satisfaction is making most of these pieces from scratch, most of them, you can’t buy at a hobby shop or anywhere else. When I first thought about this many months ago, I was hoping for an aged, neighborhood shop where everybody takes their car to be worked on late at night, over a few beers and some good music. I think I’m pretty close to that.