1:64 Scale Surfboard For Diorama Beetle

Building 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardBuilding 1:64 Scale SurfboardHad some time this evening and decided to make a surfboard to go with the roof rack that I completed yesterday for the 1:64 scale diorama. Wanted it to look vintage, so I decided to make it out of wood with a nice seal. I started with a popsicle stick, cut it to length, trimmed the sides, then started sanding to get the right dimensions. For a fin, I cut a piece of card stock, attached it with super glue, then coated the whole board in super glue to give it a nice finish and shine. Pretty quick and easy project, took maybe an hour or so.

Diorama Update / 1:64 Scale VW Beetle Roof Rack Version 2

1:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 21:64 Scale Roof Rack Version 2Even though I was happy with my first attempt at a 1:64 scale roof rack for the diorama Beetle, I knew that I could do a better job with it. I re-thought the design and started from scratch again. Small paper clips were still used for the frame. Instead of trying glue anything, I soldered it together with a much smaller tip on my soldering iron. For the wooden slats, I used strips of card stock soaked in super glue. I was a little more patient with this attempt and I think it turned out much better. I may give it a 3rd try in the future, but I’m much happier with this one than I was with the first one.

Diorama Update / 1:64 Scale VW Beetle Roof Rack

Diorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackDiorama Beetle Roof RackCompleted Roof RackCompleted Roof RackSince I had fairly good success making the swamp cooler for the Beetle diorama, I wanted to continue to add by making a roof rack for the Beetle. I kicked around ideas for materials and finally decided to use small paper clips for the frame. I didn’t want it to look new, so removing the kinks from the paper clip gave it just enough wear. I used needle nose pliers to bend and shape the frame, trying my best to keep in to scale. I also tried different methods to hold the frame together. JB Weld didn’t work very well and it was very clumpy. Epoxy didn’t well either and like the JB Weld, it was clumpy. I had a little success with super glue gel, but in the end, it just didn’t work out. I ended up soldering the parts together. It’s still a little clumpy, not too bad. For the wooden slats, I was going to use a popsicle stick, but the scale wasn’t so great. What I ended up doing was folding a piece of paper 4 ways and gluing it together. This gave me a good thickness that was close to scale. After the glue was dry, I cut it into strips, dunked them into stain and let them dry. I did use the super glue to secure the slats to the frame. All in all, I’m pleased. It’s not perfect, but building one from scratch at this scale is very difficult.

Some Roof Rack Bling

Case For Roof RackCase For Roof RackCase For Roof RackCase For Roof RackCase For Roof RackCase For Roof RackCase For Roof RackCase For Roof RackLast year for Fathers Day, Lenora bought a vintage cooler and straps for me to add to Mabels roof rack. Love the look and get lots of complements on the set up. I still wanted to add one more item just to offset everything. A couple of weeks ago I came across an old camera case at work that was going to be thrown out. Nice aluminum case with 50 year wear, but still in very good condition. To bad the camera was long gone. I thought it’d compliment the cooler and add the offset that I wanted. I wanted to put some kind of decal, logo or something on it just to spruce it up a bit. I found a picture on the web that I thought would be nice so I printed out a few on the colored laser jet and started kicking around some ideas. I ended up settling for what you see in the pics above. I aged the paper print with some brown and black spray paint. I was just going to glue the paper to the case then clear coat over top of it but I didn’t know what affect this may have on the laser jet ink. So after some quick research, it appeared that Mod Podge was the way to go. Once I had the “sign” looking the way I wanted, I taped off the area on the case, applied some Mod Podge, then laid the paper sign in place. I used a damp sponge to remove any air pockets and to carefully smooth out any wrinkles. I took the heat gun with a low setting to help dry the Mod Podge. Let it sit for a while to finish curing, then did the same thing to the other side of the case. Once both sides of the case were dry, I applied a generous coat of Mod Podge over top of the paper sign and let it dry. Final step was to spray both sides with acrylic flat clear coat and let it dry. Nice little project and I’m pleased with the outcome!

Update:
Roof Rack BlingRoof Rack BlingVW Roof Rack BlingVW Roof Rack BlingVW Roof Rack BlingVW Roof Rack BlingVW Roof Rack BlingSo I decided to add a couple more decals to the case. I remember as a kid, a local VW dealership in my hometown. The owner of the dealership was Bill Niesel. Much controversy surrounded Bill Niesel when his wife was kidnapped in murdered in August, 1974.